The Rise and Fall of Hope and Change

The Rise and Fall of Hope and Change

Alexis de Toqueville

The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.
Alexis de Tocqueville

The United States Capitol Building

The United States Capitol Building

The Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention

The Continental Congress

The Continental Congress

George Washington at Valley Forge

George Washington at Valley Forge

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

EDUCATION MADNESS? NYC BANS WORDS LIKE ‘HALLOWEEN’, ‘DINOSAURS, AND ‘BIRTHDAYS’ FROM TESTS

From The Blaze:


EDUCATION MADNESS? NYC BANS WORDS LIKE ‘HALLOWEEN’, ‘DINOSAURS, AND ‘BIRTHDAYS’ FROM TESTS

Is there a difference between censorship and blocking the use of certain words to protect the feelings of some people? The New York City school system believes there is and has instructed companies that create testing materials to exclude dozens of words and terms from their submissions.
Some of the “offensive” words and topics:
  • Dinosaur – apparently people who don’t believe in evolution might be offended
  • Halloween – rumored to support Paganism and that bothers some
  • Birthday – Jehovah‘s Witnesses don’t celebrate birthdays, so nobody else should know about it… right?
  • Dancing - unless it is ballet dancing
  • Computers – if mentioned as being in homes… use in schools and libraries is ok
Those are just a few of the subjects considered to be taboo on tests. The city sent a memo to companies that create tests for the NYC schools, more than four dozen words were on a list to be excluded from testing materials. Topics like divorce and disease are to be avoided, because a student taking a test could be the child of a split marriage or might have a sick relative. Mentions of wealthy people could create jealousy. Poverty is also off limits, as poor or non-wealthy kids could be offended.
The New York Post reported on the story and tracked down a NY-DOE spokeswoman and got the following clarification on  the exclusion guidelines:
“This is standard language that has been used by test publishers for many years and allows our students to complete practice exams without distraction,” said a Department of Education spokeswoman, insisting it’s not censorship.
The Post article also mentioned that “slavery” is not to be mentioned and “terrorism” is too toxic for tests. This seems a tad ironic as NYC was the site of America’s deadliest terror attack.
The local ABC affiliate reported on the story and also spoke with parents about the removal of language from the tests.

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